Download Atrocities, Massacres, and War Crimes: An Encyclopedia, by Alexander Mikaberidze PDF

By Alexander Mikaberidze

The 400-plus entries in "Atrocities, Massacres, and warfare Crimes: An Encyclopedia" offer obtainable and concise details at the tricky topic of abject human violence dedicated on all continents. The entries during this two-volume paintings describe atrocities, massacres, and battle crimes devoted within the twentieth century, thereby documenting how humans have many times confirmed their strength to dedicate bad acts of inhumanity even in fairly fresh instances and in the sleek period. The encyclopedia covers nations, treaties, and phrases; profiles people who were officially indicted for struggle crimes in addition to those that have dedicated mass atrocities and long gone unpunished; and addresses human rights violations, crimes opposed to humanity, and crimes opposed to peace.

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New York: St. MartinÊs Press, 1997. Sarkar, Sumit. Modern India, 1885ă1947. New York: St. MartinÊs Press, 1989. Wolpert, Stanley. A New History of India, New York : Oxford University Press, 1977. Andersonville Prison Andersonville was the infamous Confederate prison that housed Union prisoners of war (POWs) in 1864ă1865. Andersonville prison was situated just outside Andersonville, Georgia, in Sumter County. Many Confederates referred to it as Camp Sumter. The site was chosen primarily because it was isolated from population centers, was situated along a railroad line, and was surrounded by fertile lands that could produce food for the inmates.

MartinÊs Press, 1989. Wolpert, Stanley. A New History of India, New York : Oxford University Press, 1977. Andersonville Prison Andersonville was the infamous Confederate prison that housed Union prisoners of war (POWs) in 1864ă1865. Andersonville prison was situated just outside Andersonville, Georgia, in Sumter County. Many Confederates referred to it as Camp Sumter. The site was chosen primarily because it was isolated from population centers, was situated along a railroad line, and was surrounded by fertile lands that could produce food for the inmates.

In early spring 1987, Saddam Hussein named Ali Hassan al-Majid | as secretary-general of the administrative zone called the Northern Bureau, which controlled Iraqi Kurdistan. Al-Majid, who soon earned a grisly moniker of Chemical Ali, launched a series of attacks on Kurdish villages, destroying settlements and resettling thousands of Kurds to detention centers in other regions of Iraq. The Kurds resisted this forcible relocation and clashes erupted between them and the government forces. In response, the BaÊathist regime sanctioned the mass killing of anyone who refused to leave their villages.

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